Honors 10

Welcome to Honors 10. Upcoming classes, assignments, and past assignments can all be found here. Scroll down for information (newer classes appear first).

9/21/17

DUE: Claim paragraph on Rockwell / Rivera. Annotation check for The Crucible (if I can remember!)

In Class: More compare/contrast with Springsteen and Jay Z focusing on symbolism and imagery.

HW: Papers through Google Classroom.: Class Codes: 6th Period: chdi3hz;   8th Period: jzhnlz

9/19/17

In class: We will compare/contrast two paintings:

Exit Ticket: Write one lengthy paragraph: Use the Claim, Data, Commentary format to compare and contrast two paintings by Rockwell and Rivera.

9/15/17

DUE: Final annotation check

In Class: Finish posters (?) work on literary components as a review… start to think about writing essays – electronic submission through Google Classroom.

Class Codes: 6th Period: chdi3hz;   8th Period: jzhnlz

Videos: Plot; Character; Setting; SymbolsMotifStyle; Theme Act One; Theme Act Two; Theme Act Three

HW: First Drafts due on September 27

9/13/17

DUE: All unfinished poster presentations, All reading / annotating in The Crucible

In Class: We should finish posters and then begin the long march to reviewing literary components. Today will include a pre-assessment.

HW: None, as long as you have finished the play. Checking annotations on Friday. For those incredibly eager, here is what is coming: Crucible Essay

9/11/17

DUE: Poster Presentations (we will actually do several in class this time!)

In Class: New seating chart! We will discuss grades on the quiz, and then you will be required to listen and take notes on all the presentations.

HW: Annotations Act 4 due next class.

9/7

DUE: Poster Presentations on literary time periods

In Class: An opportunity to express understandings followed by Poster Presentations.

HW: Act 4 Annotations due on Wednesday next week.

9/5

DUE: Annotations for Act 3 of The Crucible. 

In Class: Today we will begin with a few Biography Brochures, give you reading time for The Crucible and then switch to the posters for literary time periods. I will also cover the rubric for this assignment.

HW: Presentations will be on Thursday – September 7. Poster Rubric

8/31

Due: Puritan sheet w/annotations AND TPCASTT worksheet AND claim paragraph.

In class: Biography Brochures will get us rolling, then we will get into small groups to discuss our TPCASTT answers and read our claim paragraphs aloud. Then, we will break into the large group for a proper literature circle. This should take up about half the class. The rest of the class will be devoted to work/planning time for your Time Period Posters.

HW: Read and annotate Act 3 of The Crucible (due TUESDAY of next week). Literary Time Period Group posters will be due on Thursday, September 7. Possible Quiz on Crucible reading next week as well.

 

8/29/17

Due: Biography Brochures

In class: Let’s start with a few of the Biography Brochures for fun, then we will work through a powerpoint on connotation. This should help us when we turn to the Colonialists: Read and annotate the Puritans sheet before being put into groups to explain what is going on there using this template: TPCASTT. Before class ends, make your plans for finishing your Literary Time Periods POSTER. You will have some time to work on it Thursday in class – plan about half that time.

HW: 1. Due on Thursday: You must write your OWN claim paragraph for the poet/author your group worked on in class. 2. Read and annotate Act 3 of The Crucible (due TUESDAY of next week).

8/25/17

Due: Annotations and claim paragraph (previously assigned on Monday) on The Crucible. I have only assigned one claim paragraph over the first Act of the play.

In Class Today (Friday): We begin with Biography Brochures: totally fun and easy way to start the day. If you miss class, check with another student about what this involves. After that, we will work on collaborative posters to illustrate literary time periods and I will hand back your summer assignments to make that easier. Hopefully many of you will have gotten your iPads. They will be useful.

HW: Assign group parts so you may find illustrations / graphics for the posters.

8/23/17

In Class: Because I had to be out due to a family necessity, I had the substitute direct an in-class reading and annotation day: Annotate up to page 52 in The Crucible (Act 2). I also left instruction that I would pick up your Claim paragraphs on Friday (although many of you did so anyway).

HW: Only the annotations.

8/21/17

In Class: After collecting your course guideline signatures, I will cover your homework and give you some time to work on annotations. I next have you demonstrate CDC (Claim, Data, Commentary) in the form of a Claim Paragraph. You will use personal experience and observation to prove your argument:

Prompt:  Quantify the amount of time you spend on social media and take a position on whether or not this needs to change.

HW: Go-back and re-read the first 25 pages of The Crucible, and using your Annotations bookmark, choose one of the prompt series, and write a one paragraph reflection based on those questions.

8/17/17

In Class: Today we will take a look at the course guidelines, read in class, take and excursion, and finish with some treats (oh, and you will be tasked with reading more at home).

HW: Signed syllabus and reading The Crucible (first 25 pages including Arthur Miller biography and the reasons he said he wrote the play). Also, please ask an adult about the American historical time period known as “The Red Scare” and who exactly was Joseph McCarthy. Be thinking about how the Red Scare might connect with a play about the Salem Witch Trials.

 

 

 

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May 10-12

In Class: Both days will be structured the same – reading followed by watching In the Time of the Butterflies.

HW: Reading. Try to finish the book ASAP – iPad collections are on Tuesday and although you will still have access to the book through finals, it will have to be on a different device if you don’t finish it.

May 8, 2017

In Class: Today you will work with this document to gain background knowledge about the history of the Dominican Republic: DR Map

Exit Ticket: Turn in by the end of class.

May 4 & 6, 2017

In Class: Media Teams presentations.

HW: Turn-in Annotated bibliographies or Survey (Questions/Charts). Hard copies only please.

April 26 & April 28, 2017

In Class: Work days for Media Teams and also for In the Time of Butterflies reading.

HW: Finish presentations; Annotated Bibliographies and Surveys to turn in.

April 24, 2017

In Class: Book test on The Things They Carried.

HW: Chapter review questions are now due through Google Docs. Turn your books in on Weds. Continue reading In the Time of Butterflies.

April 20, 2017

In Class: Today is effectively a work day – to catch up with group members who missed the last class, assign media team roles, and work on the project. Survey writers MUST complete their Google Forms and share them with me TODAY to have enough time to get their data back in time for presentations. If you FINISH anything early (surveys) are run out of momentum on the media teams, use the time to finish up The Things They Carried.

HW: Book test on The Things They Carried: Literary Components.

April 18, 2017

In Class:  I will share your media teams with you and you can start to think about how to work on those. I will also briefly introduce In The Time of Butterflies.

HW: Finish the bookThe Things They Carried and Chapter Questions… unit final on Monday of next week. Slide Show on Media Teams: Media

April 16, 2017

In Class: You will take a bit of a reading, annotating, and writing Quiz over two stories in The Things They Carried.

HW: Reading, chapter questions.

April 12, 2017

In Class: Class meets in room 236 today. Today we will have a bit of Lit Circle time forThe Things They Carried, and maybe throw up the rhetorical triangle once more to discuss the purpose of the story Along the Rainy River.

HW: Discussion questions, through Google Classroom.

April 10

In Class: Reading and workshop time will dominate as we read and process The Things They Carried.

HW: Discussion questions, through Google Classroom will be due in a few weeks, although tonight, relax, and be prepared for the PSAT.

April 6, 2017

In Class: After reviewing literary components and talking about Aristotle’s argumentative appeals, we will watch a visual prompt and complete a useful tool called the rhetorical triangle. You will be given the last part of class for reading The Things They Carried.

HW: Reading The Things They Carried

April 4, 2017

In Class: We begin The Things They Carried with a Google Classroom assignment and some reading. I will give you a chance to get through some historical context through photo journalism as well.

HW: Reading The Things They Carried

March 15, 2017

In Class: Today we will run through quotes in groups through a Jigsaw format. Each group will assign each group member a role and then you will collaborate on a Google Slides presentation. Exit Ticket: Each individual will need to turn in the work sheet designed to help you build the slides presentation.

HW: Reading through chapter 24 – Chapter review questions through that point by Friday, March 17.

March 13, 2017

In Class: Reading and book discussion will take up the bulk of class!

HW:  Reading through chapter 24 – Chapter review questions through that point by Friday, March 17.

March 9, 2017

In Class: After the Quiz, we will discuss symbolism and major motifs in Catcher in the Rye.

HW: Reading /Chapter Review Questions.

March 7, 2017

In Class: Reading and discussion over Catcher in the Rye. Continue to work on your chapter review questions. Quiz on Thursday.

HW:  Quiz on Thursday – Chapters 1-12.

March 3, 2017

In Class: Activity with Catcher in the Rye in class.

HW: Reading

March 1, 2017

In Class: Today you will take a pre-test for Catcher in the Rye in the style of a standardized testing essay.

HW: Reading

February 27, 2017

In Class: Today we will introduce a new book, Catcher in the Rye, through some background information on  the author and a free-write over word associations. Then you will have in-class reading time.

HW: Reading: Catcher in the Rye

February 23, 2017

In Class: Today you will take your unit final. We will start with a fun review. Then we will talk about norms and expectations for the test. After some inspiration (symbolism at its best), you may dig into your test: Multiple Choice and Extended analytical writing.

HW:  Look around the District’s Digital Library for some inspiration… check out a new book!

February 21, 2017

In Class: Check in your copies of The Great Gatsby.  Turn in your Book Portfolios. 2. Hero’s Presentations will be nearly finished, and Alchemist themes will be discussed. We will also look at Overdrive (the district’s digital libraries) to troubleshoot for our test on Thursday.

HW: Alchemist Final (PSAT Style Test) on Thursday.

February 15

In Class: Play! Today we will take the opportunity to see the play.

HW: Presentations and Book Porfolios…

February 13, 2017

In Class:  Book group discussions. Small groups. Work on Themes from The Alchemist. Hero’s Journey Project Presentations…

HW:  Book Portfolio: CDC paragraph on final THEME of your choosing. Games requirement. Turn in Book Portfolio’s on Tuesday, February 21.

February 9:

In Class: Alchemist Quiz. Papers due Friday (February 10) at Midnight. Hero’s Journey Projects.

HW: FINISH the book.

February 7:

In Class: Today you will have reading and peer editing time. I will also give you a Chapter Review Guide to help you for a QUIZ on Thursday. Also, put the guide into your Book Portfolios. Read through page 143 of The Alchemist for the quiz. We will begin our hero’s journey’s with about 45 minutes left in class.

HW: Reading through page 143, Quiz on Monday. Final drafts of Gatsby papers due Thursday.

January 30:

In Class: Think about and organize a CDC CLAIM paragraph related to your own Hero’s Journey and your relationship to nature. IF nature is not explicitly found as a setting in your journey as you contemplated and produced it for the class, see if you can fit it in anyway! If that feels just impossible, use the following sentence frames:  If I associated one word with the concept of nature in my life, that word would be ______________________.  For example _________________________________________. This demonstrates my relationship with nature because ____________________. Write a CDC Claim Paragraph and add it to your Book Portfolio under the Theme section. After we finish talking about this, we will listen/observe several HJ projects (exit tickets – I noticed, I wondered, What if…), and finally, embark on some peer editing: Copy and Paste Link into your own paper in replacement of the mini-rubric I left for you on the first draft.

HW: Only reading for your Book.  Try to read up to page 125 in your book. No further paper homework, but we will continue to peer edit.

January 26, 2017:

IN Class: Half of the class will read Article 1 and present the merits and detractions of GMO’s (genetically modified organisms). The other half of the class will read Article 2 and take a position as well.

HW: Reading, Hero’s Journey Project, and Final Gatsby papers.  Turn in Gatsby book on Monday as well.

January 24, 2017:

In Class: After we put together our covers/plastic, you can finish up your Theme Paragraph and Word Wizard. Then we can continue the story. Your next assignment will be the Action Tracker.

HW:  Finish the Action Tracker to page 100. Final Gatsby Papers are due Monday, January 30, as are your Hero’s Journey Projects. Turn in Gatsby books then as well.

January 20, 2017:

In Class: Paint day! We will work on watercolor covers for our Book Portfolios.

HW: Read The Alchemist to page 75, HJ’s Projects are DUE January 30, Book Portfolio: 1) CDC Theme Paragraph, Word Wizard.

January 18, 2017:

In Class:  We will start by a re-telling of the Myth of Narcissus before reading the version in the book, The Alchemist. We will then look at possible meanings and interpretations, introducing the main literary theme topics, and the Book Portfolio concept for this unit.

HW: Read The Alchemist to page 50, HJ’s Projects are DUE January 30, Book Portfolio: 1) CDC Theme Paragraph, Word Wizard.

January 12, 2017

In Class: We start a new unit today dealing with three literary concepts:  The Hero’s Journey, Coming of Age Stories, and Universal Themes of Human Struggle.

HW: Read The Alchemist and be thinking about your own Hero’s journey.

January 10, 2017

In Class: Today is your opportunity to ask questions and work in-class on rough drafts of your Gatsby Paper. Students who finish early (before the deadline) may seek extra opportunities to get ahead of our next unit.

HW: Rough drafts due by midnight tonight IF you want the chance to re-write.

January 4, 2017

In Class: Click on this link and make a copy, rename, and share with editing privileges with Mr. Frick: Gatsby Paper Link. Today we will watch more of the movie and if time, begin to work on the paper.

HW: Paper rough drafts (papers that want to be eligible for re-writes) must be turned in on Tuesday, January 10.

January 2, 2017

In Class: I will announce your first HW and major paper assignment of the semester. Before we will watch some of the movie, we will go over a note-catching document for you to use while viewing. We will watch more of the movie until class ends.

HW: Be thinking how you want to answer the prompt.

December 15, 2016

In Class: Finals day! We will finish up presentations, and then be ready to write! When you finish, please fill out a feedback survey for Ms. Strovink.

December 13, 2016

In Class: You will present your posters and turn in your CDC paragraphs today.

December 9, 2016

In Class: I will share an exmplar CDC paragraph , and you will have the remainder of class to work on posters and paragraphs for your presentations on Tuesday.

HW: Finish paragraphs and presentations; due Tuesday, December 13th.

December 7, 2016

In Class: We will have a brief talk about comparative writing, and the remainder of class will be dedicated to working on final projects.

December 5, 2016

In Class: I will introduce your final project today (please note, we will also have an in-class, written final during finals week). After discussing expectations and theme, you will have the remainder of the class to work on your projects in groups.

HW: Work on final projects

December 1, 2016

In Class: We will start with discussing the questions you came up with as homework. Then we will talk about the final lines of The Great Gatsby and the linchpins of meaning for the book as a whole. Then we will do a jigsaw activity comparing the major motifs of the novel to the modern day.

Honesty/Artifice: inconsistent memory, Fake News, Gender Roles: Kim Kardashian, The End of Men, Adultery: Anthony WeinerAshley Madison, Class: 99%Grey Gardens

November 29, 2016

In Class: We will have our final reading quiz of the semester at the start of class. Then we will talk briefly about CDC paragraphs, theme, and analysis. Then we will reexamine the structure of The Great Gatsby with the context of the final chapters. The bulk of class will be taken up by you sharing your questions from the book and then going over a number of quotes from Chapter 8.

November 18, 2016

In Class: We will start with a reading quiz, then I will collect body maps and we’ll discuss how your perceptions of characters deepened or changed in chapter 7. Then we will discuss symbols and structure in chapter 7. The remainder of the class will be devoted to analyzing passages from The Great Gatsby and writing a CDC paragraph.

HW: Finish The Great Gatsby and write down 3 questions you have about the book.

November 16, 2016

In Class: We will start the day with a reading quiz, then will return to our dream boards to examine how people with differing worldviews might perceive our goals and dreams. Then we will discuss binaries in Gatsby and create character maps that examine how perception and absolutes shape characters in the novel.

HW: Read Chapter 7, finish body maps

November 14, 2016

In Class: We will start the day with a freewrite about what is beautiful and what is broken in America today. Then we will do station rotations to explore how Fitzgerald portrays and interacts with different elements of society. Students may use biographical overviews of the Fitzgeralds from the history channel and PBS for the character comparison section. They will also need the Chris Rock statement on wealth and NYT article on economic mobility. We will spend the last half hour of class writing a CDC paragraph about how Fitzgerald’s themes can be applied to the modern day.

HW: Read Chapter 6

November 10, 2016

In Class: We will start with a reading quiz, then will make vision boards and examine how the items we chose are indicative of our worldviews. Then we will delve deeper into symbolism by picking one object from the chapter and doing an optional drawing and required analysis. Powerpoint with directions and notes is here.

HW: Finish analysis.

November 8, 2016

In Class: Today we will use the motifs from homework to cover close reading. We will start with the paragraph about Gatsby’s car, then split the quotes people pulled for homework and close read them in small groups.

HW: Finish up close readings. Read chapter 5.

November 4, 2016

In Class: We will start the class with a reading quiz on chapter 3 (to palpable surprise, I am certain). We will then briefly review the parallels between Daisy and Myrtle in chapter 2, before delving into how Fitzgerald builds motifs through the introductory section of The Great Gatsby and neatly ties them up in Nick’s reflection. Then students will create Fakebook pages for Gatsby characters in google slides.

HW: Finish Fakebook pages, read chapter 4 and bring in 1 quote (sticky noted or written out separately) for each motif identified in class (artifice, honesty, the glorification of Gatsby, parties, condescension, wealth/opulence, and the class system)

November 2, 2016

In Class: We will start with a reading quiz on Chapter 2, then cover the analytic frames of symbolism, class, and gender in more depth. As we go through, we will apply those frames to chapter 2 of The Great Gatsby. Students will then select an element of the chapter to focus on and will analyze them through a paragraph, an original narrative, or a drawing.

HW: Read Chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby. Finish analysis if not completed in class.

October 31, 2016

In Class: We will begin with a reading quiz on Chapter 1. Then we will cover some history of The Great Gatsby and F. Scott Fitzgerald, followed by locating some quotes to support various modes of interpretation people have taken with Gatsby. We will use those quotes to support small-group discussions and then write independent paragraphs examining Fitzgerald’s interaction with society.

HW: Read Chapter 2 of The Great Gatsby

October 27, 2016

In Class: We will start with a gallery walk on the 1920s, then have our presentations on the undefined era from the summer assignment. Then we will check out copies of The Great Gatsby while we create slides or timelines analyzing what spurred the transition from the realist and romantic era into the modernist era and how that change manifested.

HW: Finish timelines if not completed in class, read chapter 1 of Gatsby

October 25, 2016:

In Class: First we will distribute a Process Essay / Student exemplar for the five- paragraph essays. I will go over some of the frustrations and issues I saw in your writing, and give you some suggestions for re-writes: Please sign-up for a lunchtime writing conference IF you plan on turning in a re-write. We still have several student projects (Romantics) to get through. Don’t forget to share your Mark Twain (Realist) project with me as well.

HW: Re-writes / Mark Twain:  Read the prompt and answer in two Google Slides: Slide One: 1. Summarize the story, 2) Pick out your favorite line and Explain why/what it means, 3) Interpret Meaning – why is this an American Realist approach to  literature, 4) Include a Picture; Slide Two: 1) Apply a Connection/ add in your Background Knowledge, 2) Commentary on Bias (why it is relevant / not relevant to you), 3) include a Photo

October 21, 2016:

In Class: We will finish our presentations. Any left-over time, you can work on the  Mark Twain Prompt:  Mark Twain:  Read the prompt and answer in two Google Slides: Slide One: 1. Summarize the story, 2) Pick out your favorite line and Explain why/what it means, 3) Interpret Meaning – why is this an American Realist approach to  literature, 4) Include a Picture; Slide Two: 1) Apply a Connection/ add in your Background Knowledge, 2) Commentary on Bias (why it is relevant / not relevant to you), 3) include a Photo

HW: Twain Prompt is Due.

October 19, 2016:

In Class:   Presentations for those students who want to go. American Realism Prompt:  Mark Twain.   Read the prompt and answer in two Google Slides: Slide One: 1. Summarize the story, 2) Pick out your favorite line and Explain why/what it means, 3) Interpret Meaning – why is this an American Realist approach to  literature, 4) Include a Picture; Slide Two: 1) Apply a Connection/ add in your Background Knowledge, 2) Commentary on Bias (why it is relevant / not relevant to you), 3) include a Photo

HW: Further Presentations on October 21 (Friday – CHANGE, due to PSAT); 2 Slide Presentations DUE as well on Mark Twain Prompt:  Mark Twain.

October 13, 2016

In Class:  Final drafts of papers DUE TODAY. We will finish the Emily Dickenson poems and move to a short story by Edgar Allen Poe. Then we will break into groups for a major project, which is homework so make plans to get together with people outside of class to complete:

HW: In small groups (minimum of two people, max of three), pick your own Romantic Poet, Novelist, or Nonfiction writer and create a multi-media or live presentation including Props and Costumes.  In doing this you make also create one of the following: a play (Teatro), a video, Prezi, or song.  Areas to cover include: Pictures, Biography, Style, Famous works AND one of the famous works must be highlighted or showcased as a part of the presentation.  Each three to five minute presentation will be on Wednesday of next week. Unlike the posters we have done for each Unit Time Period, this should be a lot more thought-provoking and creative. This is DUE on October 19. Since this is time-sensitive, failure to be ready on that day will result in the loss of one letter grade.

October 11, 2016

In Class: Today we begin with the Romantics. First students will have a free-write on the term Romantics before reading some class poetry. We will break into small groups to jigsaw different elements of three Emily Dickenson poems. If there is time, students will then present their findings as we analyze the work.

HW: Final drafts of papers will be due on Thursday, October 13.

October 7:

In Class: We will present our Revolutionary Slides and talk about what makes the writing so profound. Then we will do some E.C. with a free-write.

HW: Final drafts of papers will be due on Thursday, October 13.

October 5, 2016

In Class: Today we will begin The Revolutionaries. After some background, we will dive right in with an iPad assignment.

HW: Finish individual Exit Tickets

October 3, 2016

In Class: Please bring a hard copy of your paper to school for this class. If you have submitted one via Google Docs or email, I can make printing arrangements. It is helpful however if you bring a copy to class.

HW: Final Drafts /Re-writes of paper are due on Thursday, October 13.

September 29, 2016

In Class:  New Power- Point to help in your writing: Five Paragraph Essay Tips WITH Intoduction Examplar

Once again, I will review some of the basic components to essay writing and the literary components you might consider to set-up an argument. Five Paragraph Essays ; Literary-Components

HW: 4-5 Page paper, D/S, normal type font and margins; Choose one of three options: 1) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: What a possible theme of your Independent Novel?  2) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: What is a possible theme of The Crucible? 3) 1) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: Compare and contrast possible themes of your Independent Novel and The Crucible.  DUE: Monday, October 3, 2016

September 27, 2016
In Class: Today we will compare and contrast song lyrics to set-up another look at theme, but also see how you might structure a literary analysis paper using two texts as well.

HW: 4-5 Page paper, D/S, normal type font and margins; Choose one of three options: 1) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: What a possible theme of your Independent Novel?  2) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: What is a possible theme of The Crucible? 3) 1) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: Compare and contrast possible themes of your Independent Novel and The Crucible.  DUE: Monday, October 3, 2016

September 23, 2016

In Class: Turn in your Chief Seattle paragraphs.  Power Points to digest:

Five Paragraph Essays ; Literary-Components

HW: 4-5 Page paper, D/S, normal type font and margins; Choose one of three options: 1) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: What a possible theme of your Independent Novel?  2) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: What is a possible theme of The Crucible? 3) 1) Five Paragraph Essay on Prompt: Compare and contrast possible themes of your Independent Novel and The Crucible.  DUE: Monday, October 3, 2016

 

September 21, 2016

IN Class: Turn in your Two Paragraphs. We will start with an exercise on Critical Thinking Skills. Then we will freely demonstrate the power. Next we will consider Chief Seattle, the Chart, and the written paragraph. If we have time, we will have fun with highlighters.

HW: Finish the paragraph.

September 19, 2016

IN Class:  Turn in your LOVE poems. After that we will talk about Revolutionary Artists, and do some free-writing. Then we will begin Claims and Writing: -Paintings

HW: Finish that Independent Novel. Paintings paragraphs due on Wednesday.

 

September 15, 2016

In Class: Please return your copies of The Crucible. Connotation vs. Denotation will help us learn to write LOVE POEMS. We will preview the Revolutionaries, and then we will write Sticky Note Stories.

HW: Finish Independent Novels.

September 13, 2016

In Class: We will begin with a few presentations, before having our first in-class QUIZ. Then we will move quickly to a post-read literary discussion of group vs. individual identity.

HW: Strive to finish Independent Novels.

September 9, 2016

In Class: First, you will turn-in your response to The Lost Thing. I will remind you to finish the Crucible and your Independent Novel. A free-write and small group discussion will proceed a new framework for understanding text (basic understanding). Then we will have a Reading Role Activity where you get to use your IPad. Presentations will be in-class before the class is over.

 

HW: Reading only.

September 7, 2016

In Class: After a late start, be ready to watch a short film and respond to it.

HW: Finish The Crucible and your Independent Novels by the end of the weekend, class on September 13.

September 2, 2016

In Class: Turn-in: Annotated readings AND Independent Novel prompts. Today’s Free-Write will ask you to consider a moment when you were accused of something you did not do. Then we will run a literature circle in a concerted effort to finish The Crucible.

HW: Reading Independent Novel over the weekend. Your first summative will be a paper on this book, so PLEASE keep up with your reading.

August 31,

In Class: Students will free-write on the birth of civilization. Then working in groups, they will continue their understanding of Puritan life. We will continue to read the play and enrich our understanding of the group vs. individual in terms of thematic approach to their lives.

HW: Continue to read your independent novels. Read and annotate the Puritans sheet.

For Further Reference: The Red-Baiting of Lena Horne, an article about intersectionality and the red scare.

HW: August 29, 2016

IN Class: We will begin by collecting the Independent Novel reflections, then continue with a free-write about whether common values help or hinder societies. Next we will have some time to finish our posters, after which the Colonialist group will present. Once they have presented, we will check out copies of The Crucible and read the first 20 pages as a class. Finally, we will have a jigsaw discussion of the text to dig into Arthur Miller’s portrayal of Puritan society.

HW: Reading Independent Novels.

August 25, 2016

IN Class: We will begin with a free-write (what tribes do you belong to?).  Then we will role model a Socratic Seminar with a controversial topic. Next we finish our posters and one group (the Colonialists) will present if there is time. 

HW: Continue reading your Independent Novel over the weekend. Using your Annotations bookmark, choose one of the prompt series, and write a one page reflection based on those questions.

August 23, 2016

IN Class: First we will start with a free-write about the “glass-ceiling.” Next, we will read The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin. Then you will annotate, and answer several questions (this is a reading pre-assessment). After a literary circle about your answers, we will have whatever time remains to finish up your posters.

HW: Independent Novel:  Select an independent novel and get to reading!

 

August 19, 2016

In Class: We begin with our first Free-Write:  Dear Teachers,.  I will then collect the Syllabus and Biography Brochures. I will next have you get out your summer assignment papers. In class, we will work on collaborative posters to illustrate literary time periods.  We will leave time to do an in/out activity.

HW: Find illustrations / graphics for the posters.

August 17, 2016

In Class: Syllabus – read, if time we can collaborate on anything that should be added:

  • Dialogue about food–Should food be allowed in the classroom?
    • Socratic circle
    • Use of Evidence, Participation (speaking and listening), Flow (student and classroom-centered)
    • Vote   

HW: Biography Brochures (Demonstration in class).